Welcome to GGWAdvice

Related questions

0 votes
0 answers
asked Sep 28, 2018 in hair by venynx (4,420 points)  
0 votes
0 answers
0 votes
0 answers
asked Jul 17 in hair by freemexy (22,560 points)  
0 votes
0 answers
0 votes
0 answers
Welcome to GGWAdvice, where you can ask questions and receive answers from other members of the community. Don't forget out main site Gay Guide World, the leading interactive international directory of all things gay. Also our great LGTBI network, free without ads, GGW Network

Share this question

The Latest On The U.S. And China's Strained Relations

0 votes

The Latest On The U.S. And China's Strained Relations

Relations between the U.S. and China are rapidly worsening with the latest tit-for-tat move. This week, the Trump administration ordered China's consulate in Houston to close, and Beijing retaliated by ordering the U.S. consulate in the city of Chengdu to also close - not to mention U.S. steps to sanction Chinese officials for alleged human rights abuses and to challenge Beijing's maritime claims in the South China Sea. To help us understand all this, we are joined by NPR's China correspondent John Ruwitch.To get more China latest news, you can visit shine news official website.
For three years, President Trump has remained pretty cordial with China, and he's had a decent relationship with China's leader, Xi Jinping. He's lauded Xi. There's been a floor under the relationship, even though there was a trade war. You know, and in January, they signed a Phase 1 trade deal. But the pandemic really seems to change the calculus with regard to China. Trump blames China for the pandemic. Then we had in June China passing a national security law for Hong Kong, which was highly controversial. And since then, there have been sanctions on officials, a reversal of Hong Kong's special status, the consulate closure. There've been charges against Chinese citizens suspected of spying - just one thing after another.

RUWITCH: Yeah, analysts say Mike Pompeo, the secretary of state, is leading the charge. He's been very tough on China, and his rhetoric has been harsh from the get-go. Just to give you a sense of his latest thinking, Pompeo gave a speech on Thursday at the Nixon Presidential Library in California. And it's a symbolic place because Nixon was the president that opened U.S.-China relations in the 1970s. Here's what Pompeo had to say.We have to admit a hard truth. We must admit a hard truth that should guide us in the years and decades to come, that if we want to have a free 21st century and not the Chinese century of which Xi Jinping dreams, the old paradigm of blind engagement with China simply won't get it done.

RUWITCH: It's worth noting that it's not just Pompeo who's been banging the drum on China. His speech was the latest in a series. The national security adviser, the FBI director, the attorney general have all come out with hawkish speeches on China.

FADEL: So how has China been reacting?

RUWITCH: China's generally been matching the U.S. moves step for step. So the consulate is a good example. We closed their Houston consulate. They closed our Chengdu consulate. Or when we put sanctions on Chinese officials over human rights abuses in the far western region of Xinjiang, they sanctioned members of Congress who've traditionally spoken out against China - Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio.

One analyst I spoke to said that the Trump administration seems to be setting the tone and pace in this downward spiral in U.S. relations with China. But remember, China isn't free of blame here. China has been more outspoken, more muscular on the international stage under Xi Jinping. Beijing in the past few months has not just passed the controversial National Security Law in Hong Kong. You know, it's had clashes along the border with India. It's been upsetting its neighbors in the South China Sea and not to mention an intensification of repressive policies at home.

asked Aug 11 in holidays by freemexy (22,560 points)  
    

Please log in or register to answer this question.

...